How to Settle a Personal Injury Claim for a Minor Child in Georgia

No parent ever wants to experience his or her child being seriously injured because of someone’s negligence. Should you have to pursue an insurance claim or a lawsuit on behalf of your child, Georgia has some special rules governing how personal injury cases involving minor victims (children under the age of 18) are settled.

When a minor child is injured and someone is at fault, a personal injury attorney will typically send the at-fault party and/or his insurance company a demand letter in an attempt to settle the claim. If a fair settlement is not reached through a demand letter and negotiations, or when circumstances such as time considerations dictate, a personal injury lawyer will file a lawsuit (see the prior post “Filing a Lawsuit on Behalf of a Minor Child in Georgia” for more info on who can file a lawsuit on behalf of a minor in Georgia). What happens in Georgia cases involving injured minors when a settlement is reached either before or after the filing of a lawsuit?

This blog post answers the question of what happens in the event a personal injury settlement is reached on behalf of a minor child in Georgia.

In a typical case when a settlement is agreed upon the insurance company and/or the defendant will send a release to the plaintiff. By signing the release the plaintiff agrees to settle the case in accordance with the financial payment terms and to release the defendant from further liability. When a minor is the plaintiff, however, the law does not always allow for such a simple process. The law differs when minors are involved based on the amount of the settlement.

It is important in reading below to understand that the law in Georgia defines “gross settlement” as “the present value of all amounts paid or to be paid in settlement of the claim, including cash, medical expenses, expenses of litigation, attorney's fees, and any amounts paid to purchase an annuity or other similar financial arrangement.” O.C.G.A. § 29-3-3 (a). When speaking of the value of settlements below I am speaking in terms of “gross settlement” as defined by Georgia law and which includes all of the items listed above.

When the gross settlement is more than $15,000.00:

All personal injury settlements on behalf of a minor in Georgia in which the gross settlement amount is more than $15,000.00 require court approval to finalize the agreement regardless of whether a lawsuit has been filed. O.C.G.A. §§ 29-3-3 (d) and (e). Typically, court approval will be petitioned for in probate court in cases in which no lawsuit has been filed, and, in cases in which a lawsuit has been filed, it must be done in the court where the lawsuit is pending. Id.

In many cases involving settlements on behalf of minors in which the amount is $15,000.00 or more, there must be a conservator in place before any court will approve the settlement.

  • When a conservator is required: When the gross settlement is for $15,000.00 or more and when subtracting out attorney's fees, expenses of litigation, and medical expenses which shall be paid from the settlement proceeds, the present value of amounts to be received by the minor after reaching the age of majority (18) is still $15,000.00 or more, then a conservator must be in place before any court will approve the settlement. O.C.G.A. § 29-3-3 (g). The guardian of the minor must file a petition in probate court to become conservator and then once appointed as conservator he or she asks the appropriate court (probate if no lawsuit was filed, the court where the lawsuit is pending if a lawsuit was filed) to approve the terms of the settlement.

  • When a conservator is not required: In cases in which the gross settlement is for $15,000.00 or more and when subtracting out attorney's fees, expenses of litigation, and medical expenses which shall be paid from the settlement proceeds, the present value of amounts to be received by the minor after reaching the age of majority (18) comes out to less than $15,000.00, then no conservator is required. O.C.G.A. § 29-3-3 (f). In this scenario the guardian may petition the appropriate court (probate if no lawsuit was filed, the court where the lawsuit is pending if a lawsuit was filed) to approve the terms of the settlement without first becoming a conservator.

When the gross settlement is $15,000.00 or less:

When a gross settlement has been reached for personal injuries to a minor and the amount is $15,000.00 or less, Georgia law allows the guardian of a minor to settle the claim withoutfirst becoming a conservator and without the approval of any court. O.C.G.A. § 29-3-3 (c).

Personal injury cases involving injured minors in Georgia can be complex and an attorney experienced in navigating through both the traditional litigation process as well as the probate court process is a necessity. Attorney Richard Armond is experienced in handling personal injury cases on behalf of minors in Georgia.

If you are the parent or guardian of a minor who was injured or killed as a result of someone’s negligence, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

How to Obtain Insurance Coverage Info in Georgia under O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28

This blog post by personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, a Gwinnett County law practice based in Lawrenceville, Georgia, addresses how a plaintiff obtains the defendant's insurance coverage information to begin negotiations.

Automobile Insurance Companies

The easiest cases to begin negotiations with an insurance company for an at-fault party are car accident and trucking accident cases. Why? There is typically a Georgia motor vehicle accident report and the other side's insurance policy number is listed in the report. It is a simple matter of contacting that insurance company and then sending a letter of representation which demands the policy information. Such a letter typically will cite O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(1), which requires the insurance company to provide, upon request of the plaintiff, within 60 days of the request, and under oath, the following:

  1. disclosure of each known policy of insurance issued by it, including excess or umbrella insurance,
  2. the name of the insurer,
  3. the name of each insured, and
  4. the limits of coverage.  

Homeowners Insurance Companies

When an injured person has a claim against a homeowner, the process can be somewhat more complicated. When a person is injured because of the negligence of a homeowner, sometimes there may be no official report written by law enforcement such as there is in car accident cases. Even when an incident involves a police response, the homeowners insurance information is not something that gets reported like in car accident cases where the information has to be provided. 

A Georgia personal injury attorney will often send a letter to the homeowner demanding the insurance information similar to what is sent to auto insurance companies above. Georgia law requires under O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(2), that an insured person or company shall "within 30 days of receiving a written request from a claimant or the claimant's attorney. . .disclose to the claimant or his attorney the name of each known insurer which may be liable to the claimant upon such claim." The statute, however, does not provide a remedy to the claimant if the homeowner does not comply. The practical effect is that often the only way to get that information if a homeowner does not comply and you do not know the insurer is to file a lawsuit. That often results in the homeowner's insurance company getting involved quickly and responding to the statutory requirement of a plaintiff obtaining the information through discovery.

Other Tortfeasors/Liable Parties

When a business or some other liable party is at fault, the process is similar to the process with homeowners claims. However, larger businesses will often have in-house counsel or will at least obtain counsel upon receiving a demand for insurance information pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(2). There is also typically a registered agent to send such a demand to and the understanding of the need to comply with the law. If there is no response then the result is often an earlier than usual filing of a lawsuit much like with homeowners insurance cases.

If your or a loved one have been injured by the negligence of another in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

What to tell the other driver's insurance company after a car accident in Georgia

Let me start this post with a personal story of a car accident I was in several years ago. My wife and I had taken our dogs to the park and were heading home. We came upon a line of cars stopped for someone waiting to turn left. There was nothing sudden about our stop--it was normal, safe driving.

After being stopped for several seconds I looked in my rearview mirror and saw the other car immediately before impact. Screech!. Bang! The other driver was not paying attention and had his cell phone in hand when he collided into the back of our car. He was going pretty fast and did not brake until just before impact.

To make a long story short, my wife and I declined having the police officer call an ambulance. We were both full of adrenaline and very concerned about our dogs. Neither of us felt any injury when the police officer arrived and wrote her report.

My wife began to feel abdominal pain about an hour after the wreck where her seatbelt had been. Did I mention she was four months pregnant at the time?

My mother, a registered nurse, who had come to pick us up after the wreck because our car could not be driven, let us know my wife needed to be taken to the emergency room immediately. Fortunately, there were no serious injuries to my wife or child.

How fast do insurance adjusters begin to handle auto accident cases?

Some companies have their adjusters respond to the scene and begin photographing and taking statements immediately. In our case, I received a call on the way to the hospital. It was the "friendly" adjuster from the other driver's insurance company.

The call was being recorded for "quality assurance" (I was not their customer, why would I care?). He wanted to "help" us get a claim started to "take care of" the damage to my car and "help" us get set up with a rental. But first, he wanted to let us know he was glad there were no injuries and to "make sure" everyone was okay (i.e., document in that recording that there were no injuries in the wreck). I politely told him to pound sand by informing him that my wife and I were being driven to the hospital and that I could not speak with him.

Is the other insurance company really trying to help you get a claim started, get a rental car, etc.?

No. They want to pay as little as possible for the damages their insured caused. Even little things you say after a car accident can have big impact if you are injured.

It is completely common to not feel hurt right after a wreck when the adrenaline is flowing.

It is completely normal to report to an EMT or nurse or doctor that, for example, your head hurts and that is why you need help when, in fact, on a pain scale of 1 to 10 your head is an 8, your shoulder is a 4, and your leg is a 4. The next morning your head is a down to a 4, but your shoulder is an 8, your leg is an 8, and your back and neck are 9s. The insurance company will say you only had a head injury when you reported your injuries.

In the fight to settle your case months or years later, the insurance company will use your statements against you as proof that you were not injured or that you have exaggerated your injuries because they were either minor or involved one area of the body.

What should you do after a car accident that was not your fault?

1.  If you are hurt to the extent you need immediate medical attention, call 911 or ask someone to call on behalf. 

2. Be completely truthful with the police and any medical providers such as EMTs, nurses, or doctors. Do not exaggerate injuries. You need proper medical care. But, if any part of your body was hurt you need to let the medical professionals know. Even if you have one injury that seems worse than others, let the doctor or nurse know of ALL of your injuries. Your medical charts are one of the first things an insurance company will look at in evaluating a case.

3. If able to, document the accident scene by taking photographs of the damage to all vehicles involved and any other evidence such as skid marks. Your health and safety come first and you should only do this if you are physically able to and if existing traffic conditions allow for it to be done safely.

4. If any witnesses stopped and are on scene, if physically able and existing traffic conditions are safe to do so, ask for their names and phone numbers and/or jot down their license plate numbers. Many times this information does not make it into police reports and crucial witnesses cannot be found later. 

5. Politely decline to speak with the insurance adjuster. Again, they are trying to document their file to demonstrate a claim that minimizes the amount for which they are liable. 

6. Follow all advice of treating medical professionals including following through on their treatment plans. You have a requirement to mitigate your damages. If a doctor recommends you do physical therapy or any other follow up treatment and you do not do it, the insurance company and, potentially, a jury may discount your actual damages. If a medical professional says you need treatment, get treatment. They are the medical experts. You should follow their advice and never follow the advice of an adjuster or lawyer on how to care for your injuries. 

7. Promptly call personal injury attorney Richard Armond at 678-661-9585 for a free consultation. This is listed after the part about calling 911 if hurt and getting treatment because your health and well-being come first. However, the earlier I get a case the more value I can often add. Evidence has a way of disappearing if it is not retained quickly. If you need help finding a doctor to treatment your injuries and do not have insurance I can help. If your injuries exceed the other driver's policy limit or the other driver was uninsured, you may have a uninsured motorist coverage to protect yourself, but these policies typically have strict time deadlines and requirements. I can help. But the earlier, the better.

Q: The answer to what to tell the other driver's insurance company after a car accident in Georgia?

A: Nothing (or, I just met with Richard Armond and he is my attorney, speak to him).

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car accident in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Personal Injury Settlement Calculator

In personal injury cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia, everyone wants to know how much a case is worth. This post by Richard Armond, a personal injury and wrongful death attorney based in Gwinnett County, dispels the idea that a "personal injury settlement calculator" can tell you how much a case is worth. Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, is available for free consultations regarding personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia.

The Georgia Personal Injury Settlement Calculator

Why is there no such thing in as a personal injury settlement calculator for cases in Georgia or anywhere? The simple answer is that many variables come into play. Any personal injury lawyer or website claiming to have such a calculator likely does not know what he or she is doing. Let's take a look at some of the variables which determine the value of a personal injury claim, whether it is in Gwinnett County, some other metro Atlanta county, or anywhere in the State of Georgia.

What should you beware of when asking a Georgia personal injury attorney how much your case is worth?

  1. Any Georgia lawyer or firm that claims to have a "personal injury settlement calculator." It does not exist. This is because there are too many variables and there is very much a human element to this area of the law. Ultimately, if a case does not settle, it is the conscience of a jury of twelve strangers who decide, and two different juries can reach much different results with the same set of facts.
  2. Most Georgia personal injury attorneys cannot give a close guess based on a simple phone call with five minutes of information. To get a general idea a Georgia personal injury attorney must examine all of the factors, and even then it is simply an educated guess.
  3. No magic formula exists in these cases to multiply an actual out-of-pocket loss for things like medical bills and lost wages to, for example, multiply by a certain number to get the dollar sum total of things like pain and suffering. No two insurance companies are the same nor are any two juries, any two venues, any two judges, etc.

What are some of the many variables that go into determining how much a Georgia personal injury case is worth?

  • DAMAGES

Damages include things like:

1. Past Medical Expenses

2. Future Medical Expenses -- it is unlikely you will know this number when consulting with a personal injury attorney (another example of why the mythical "personal injury settlement calculator" does not exist.

3. Past Lost Wages

4. Future Lost Wages--again, it is unlikely in many cases that this will be known early on

5. Pain and Suffering Already Experienced

6. Future Pain and Suffering--yet again, this will often be unknown

7. Costs to maintain quality of life (things in addition to future medical care such as adaptations to one's home, automobile, etc.)

8. Other damages such as permanent scarring or burns, loss of a quality of life, etc.

  • VENUE

Where a personal injury lawsuit can be brought can make a big difference. Historically, certain Georgia counties are known to have juries award larger verdicts than others. Insurance companies know this and take it into account when determining a settlement amount. 

  • WHETHER THE DEFENDANT HAS ASSETS THAT CAN BE COLLECTED

Typically, we are talking about how much insurance coverage is in place. Sometimes, with corporate defendants insurance is not as much of an issue. However, it is not uncommon for there to be a wrongful death car accident case against a driver with next to no assets and the Georgia state law minimum of $25,000 in automobile liability coverage. If the victim was not covered under an uninsured motorist policy, a case that otherwise may have been worth over a million dollars is sadly only a $25,000 case. At an initial consultation most of the time the insurance coverage information is unknown because the lawyer must send a demand to the defendant's insurer making an officer of the insurer certify under oath, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28, the policy limits of coverage and information regarding any other known insurance coverage. 

CONCLUSION:

Each case is different. The purpose of Georgia torts laws is not for someone to hit the jackpot and get rich. The law is meant to balance the scales of justice to make someone whole again by the award of compensation for an injury. When you see large jury awards on the news it is because a personal injury victim lost his life or because a personal injury victim suffered a catastrophic injury which altered her life. At the onset of a case any experienced attorney will have to qualify answers because he or she is not going to have full information to let you know the full value. It is only after gathering medical records, gathering insurance coverage information, and investigating a case that any attorney knows how much should be demanded from the other party. Hopefully, this information gives you some idea of the many variables which go into determining the value of a personal injury case.

If you or a loved one have suffered a personal injury or wrongful death in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Personal Injury Lawyers Keep the Justice System Fair

As a native of Gwinnett County and metro Atlanta, I have for years seen television advertisements for personal injury attorneys on local television. Many of these ads left a bad impression on me as a child and they contribute to the stereotype of personal injury attorneys as "ambulance chasers" or unsavory characters who pursue frivolous claims. Even in law school and when I began my career as an attorney I somewhat carried that belief about personal injury law. However, as a prosecutor I saw too often the suffering of people who lost loved ones in vehicular homicide automobile collisions, people whose lives were altered by injuries sustained in wrecks, and others who were seriously hurt or who lost loved ones because of the actions of others. 

There are scores of cases from real people who are in real need of an attorney to fight for them when they have been injured or when they have lost a loved one. Whether a case is big or small what matters is that the injuries or loss is real. There are traffic accidents where the victim suffers what insurance adjusters refer to as a "soft tissue" injury in which the victim did not need to be transported to the hospital. However, hours or days later the injury appears and medical bills mount and pain and suffering exists. There are collisions where lives are lost or there are serious injuries that require transport in an ambulance. Many times, regardless of the extent of the damages, the insurance company will not settle for anywhere close to fair value. Personal injury attorneys keep the justice system fair by taking cases to trial if the insurance company is unfair.

The key to any case is that the injury or loss is real. Despite what people think from the catchphrases we hear on TV or the way the big insurance companies portray injury attorneys, most personal injury lawyers handle real cases for real victims with claims that are not frivolous. Personal injury law is not about a victim profiting. It is about fairness for the person or is hurt or who suffered a loss.

If you or a loved one have suffered a loss because of the negligence of another, please contact injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Do icy road conditions negate auto accident claims?

Today there is a slight mix of snow and sleet falling in metro Atlanta as we are getting the first wintry weather of the season. Schools are closing early today and we will likely have the usual Atlanta panic where bread and milk are cleared out at the grocery stores. While there is usually a slight over-reaction to snow in Atlanta, we all remember the bad ice storms of the past where people are stranded on highways and cars and trucks are wrecked as drivers lose control.

If you are struck and injured by a vehicle in wintry weather conditions do you still have a case?

Probably yes. Georgia law requires drivers to drive safely even taking into account weather and highway conditions. O.C.G.A. § 40-6-180 requires:

"No person shall drive a vehicle at a speed greater than is reasonable and prudent under the conditions and having regard for the actual and potential hazards then existing. Consistently with the foregoing, every person shall drive at a reasonable and prudent speed when approaching and crossing an intersection or railroad grade crossing, when approaching and going around a curve, when approaching and traversing a hill crest, when traveling upon any narrow or winding roadway, and when special hazards exist with respect to pedestrians or other traffic or by reason of weather or highway conditions."

Consistent with O.C.G.A. § 40-6-180 if you are injured in a traffic accident where another driver loses control in icy or snowy conditions (or any other weather conditions), the law still holds the other driver accountable. You may have a claim for negligence and violating O.C.G.A. § 40-6-180.

Negligence involves proving (1) a duty, (2) a breach of that duty, (3) causation, and (4) damages. The other driver has a (1) duty to drive at a reasonable and prudent speed given the weather conditions. If he loses control of his vehicle he has (2) breached that duty. If he has struck and injured you he has (3) caused (4) damages. That is a potential claim under the laws of Georgia.

Insurance adjusters will sometimes try to deny claims based on weather conditions by arguing that the weather conditions made the accident unavoidable or that they were an act of God. That is simply not the law in Georgia. 

If another driver has struck and injured you in poor weather conditions in Georgia, please contact attorney Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Even very low speed rear-end wrecks result in injuries the majority of the time.

This post provides information for Georgia drivers who have been injured in rear-end collisions, even wrecks occurring at low speeds, on the prevalence of injuries to the occupants of the car that was rear-ended. 

According to a study by researchers at the Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University analyzing the effects of low speed rear end collisions on occupants of vehicles struck from the rear, "a majority of struck occupants, 113 out of 151, had complaints attributed to the crash that were diagnosed by a M.D., D.O. or chiropractor within a five week treatment period post-crash." This study (click link here) looked at wrecks where the at-fault vehicle was traveling 15 km/h or less, which in miles per hour translates to 9.32 mph or less. In other words, injuries such as whiplash are very real and commonplace. And, contrary to what insurance companies will have you believe, such injuries occur more times than not in vehicle occupants struck even at very low speeds. 

If you have been struck by another vehicle and experience pain and soreness, seek medical treatment. The science shows these injuries are real. Hopefully, they will amount to minor soreness where everything heals on its own. But, injuries in car wrecks can linger and can result in persistent pain. No one wants to go through the process of continued medical treatment and rehabilitations, but accident injuries are real. If you have been put on a treatment or rehabilitation plan, follow the advice of your medical care providers. Your health is priority one after a wreck. 

If you have been injured in a car accident and would like to speak with a Georgia personal injury attorney please contact Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation today.

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

The Importance of Medical Records in Proving Your Georgia Injury Claim

In order to recover financial compensation in a personal injury claim, the plaintiff, or injured party, must prove, among other elements, causation and damages. Typically, medical records are the most important source of proof of damages, and can be useful in proving causation.

Medical records serve as documentation that an injury arose from a particular event. This is why it is so important if you are injured in any type of accident, whether automobile, workplace, slip and fall, etc., to seek immediate medical treatment. The immediate need for care demonstrates to an insurance company or jury that the recent event caused your injury. Medical records and opinions from medical experts can also be used to show the event caused a new injury or exacerbated an old injury when the defendant is claiming you have a pre-existing injury.

Medical records are also used to calculate the amount of damages. This is the dollar amount your loss is worth. Medical records can help to put a hard dollar amount on the amount spent on your care to date. This will include your initial visit to the emergency room or physician, follow up treatments, rehabilitation, and any other medical care necessary. Your physician's prognosis can also be used to show future medical expenses when care for your injury may be ongoing for months or years. 

Medical records can also be helpful in showing non-economic damages such as pain and suffering, mental and emotional distress, loss of quality of life, etc. Though the medical records will not put an exact dollar figure on these losses, they are part of a total claim and the medical records can speak to what a victim has suffered. 

If you or a loved one have been injured in an accident and need medical attention, go to the emergency room or your physician immediately. Your health should be priority number one. Follow the treatment recommendations of your medical providers. If you would like to speak with an attorney about your injury please contact Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation today.

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585.The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.