Determining the number of accidents under insurance policies in Georgia

This blog post by Gwinnett County based wrongful death and personal injury lawyer Richard Armond addresses Georgia's legal standard for how courts determine under particular sets of facts where multiple people are injured whether an insurance policy covers an insured for a single accident/occurrence (with a single policy limit of liability coverage) or more than one accident/occurrence (with more than one policy limit of liability coverage) when the policy does not specifically define an accident. The Georgia Supreme Court in 2010 adopted a "cause theory" for making this determination as explained below. This is extremely important in cases where more than one person is injured because often multiple plaintiffs have but a single policy limit to cover their losses, but every so often the facts dictate multiple accidents/occurrences in which the policy limits of liability coverage apply separately. Trial attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, is based in Lawrenceville, Georgia, and he handles cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia.

Many insurance policies, whether auto, home, or other types of liability policies, cover an insured for liability on a per accident or per occurrence basis. An example is with liability coverage on an auto policy where a person has bare minimum bodily injury liability coverage allowed under Georgia law of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident. If the insured gets in one wreck which injures two people who incurred $100,000 in medical bills, the policy will only cover a total of $50,000 (and no more than $25,000 as to each person) and not the total loss of $100,000. However, if the the insured's car was drivable and ten minutes later he wrecked and injured a third person, this would typically be a separate accident and the policy limit of liability coverage would be available to cover the insured for damages to that person. 

Sometimes, however, it is difficult to determine whether injuries to multiple people happened in one accident or occurrence or multiple accidents or occurrences. The Georgia Supreme Court case of State Auto Prop. & Cas. Co. v. Matty, 690 S.E.2d 614, 286 Ga. 611 (Ga., 2010) sets forth the applicable legal standard in Georgia for determining whether injuries were sustained in one accident or occurrence or multiple accidents or occurrences. This case is incredibly important in serious injury and wrongful death cases involving more than one injured person because it dictates, as to most common liability policies, whether a single policy limit will apply to all victims, or whether more than one policy limit will be available.

In State Auto Prop. & Cas. Co. v. Matty a negligent driver struck a bicyclist, killing him, and then just over a second later struck a second bicyclist, seriously injuring him. The negligent driver's auto policy had a bodily injury liability policy limit of $100,000 for each accident. The insurance company contended these facts constituted a single accident with a single limit of $100,000, while the claimants contended the facts demonstrated two accidents with a two $100,000 limits of coverage. Id. at 690 S.E.2d 616.

The Georgia Supreme Court adopted a "cause theory," meaning that to determine if a set of facts involves one accident or more than one accident, a court looks at the number of causes of the injuries and asks if "there was but one proximate, uninterrupted, and continuing cause which resulted in all of the injuries and damage." Id. at 690 S.E.2d 617. Further, in the context of an automobile accident "courts look to whether, after the cause of the initial collision, the driver regained control of the vehicle before a subsequent collision, so that it can be said there was a second intervening cause and therefore a second accident." Id.

Ultimately, in the Matty case under the facts outlined above, there were two accidents and not just one because there was some evidence through the testimony of an accident investigator that "after the cause of the initial collision, [Rachel] regained control of the vehicle before [the] subsequent collision, so that it [could] be said there was a second intervening cause and therefore a second accident." State Auto Prop. & Cas. Co. v. Matty, Docket No. 11-10419 [unpublished opinion], (11th Cir. 2011).

It is important to note that the Matty case before the Georgia Supreme Court is limited to cases in which the applicable insurance policies does not explicitly define "accident." If a policy includes some specific definition in which a scenario such as that in Matty is a single accident, then the policy will likely only cover one policy limit as a matter of contract law between the insurance company and the insured driver. 

Cases in which multiple people are injured can be complex. An experienced serious injury and wrongful death attorney is needed to properly determine and argue coverage issues to ensure no stone is left unturned regarding potential insurance to cover a loss. 

If you or a loved one have been injured by the negligence of another in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

How to Obtain Insurance Coverage Info in Georgia under O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28

This blog post by personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, a Gwinnett County law practice based in Lawrenceville, Georgia, addresses how a plaintiff obtains the defendant's insurance coverage information to begin negotiations.

Automobile Insurance Companies

The easiest cases to begin negotiations with an insurance company for an at-fault party are car accident and trucking accident cases. Why? There is typically a Georgia motor vehicle accident report and the other side's insurance policy number is listed in the report. It is a simple matter of contacting that insurance company and then sending a letter of representation which demands the policy information. Such a letter typically will cite O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(1), which requires the insurance company to provide, upon request of the plaintiff, within 60 days of the request, and under oath, the following:

  1. disclosure of each known policy of insurance issued by it, including excess or umbrella insurance,
  2. the name of the insurer,
  3. the name of each insured, and
  4. the limits of coverage.  

Homeowners Insurance Companies

When an injured person has a claim against a homeowner, the process can be somewhat more complicated. When a person is injured because of the negligence of a homeowner, sometimes there may be no official report written by law enforcement such as there is in car accident cases. Even when an incident involves a police response, the homeowners insurance information is not something that gets reported like in car accident cases where the information has to be provided. 

A Georgia personal injury attorney will often send a letter to the homeowner demanding the insurance information similar to what is sent to auto insurance companies above. Georgia law requires under O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(2), that an insured person or company shall "within 30 days of receiving a written request from a claimant or the claimant's attorney. . .disclose to the claimant or his attorney the name of each known insurer which may be liable to the claimant upon such claim." The statute, however, does not provide a remedy to the claimant if the homeowner does not comply. The practical effect is that often the only way to get that information if a homeowner does not comply and you do not know the insurer is to file a lawsuit. That often results in the homeowner's insurance company getting involved quickly and responding to the statutory requirement of a plaintiff obtaining the information through discovery.

Other Tortfeasors/Liable Parties

When a business or some other liable party is at fault, the process is similar to the process with homeowners claims. However, larger businesses will often have in-house counsel or will at least obtain counsel upon receiving a demand for insurance information pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 33-3-28(a)(2). There is also typically a registered agent to send such a demand to and the understanding of the need to comply with the law. If there is no response then the result is often an earlier than usual filing of a lawsuit much like with homeowners insurance cases.

If your or a loved one have been injured by the negligence of another in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Charter Bus from Gwinnett Headed to Masters Wrecks, Overturns

Driver alleged to have been DUI

According to the Gwinnett Daily Post, a charter bus from Gwinnett County crashed and overturned today on its way to the Masters in Augusta, Georgia. The story reports that there were 18 passengers on board and several were taken to the hospital. Fortunately, it appears the injuries were not life threatening. The driver of the bus was alleged to have been a DUI driver at the time of the incident. As a Gwinnett County personal injury and wrongful death attorney who handles cases throughout the State of Georgia, this sad incident brings up several legal issues regarding the rights of the injured.

Federal Law Requires Minimum Insurance for a Bus with this Number of Passengers

Knowing that the bus was one which carried 16 or more passengers, under Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Subtitle B, Chapter III, Subchapter B, Subpart C, § 387.303 the owner/operator was required to maintain a minimum of $5,000,000 in insurance liability coverage. Hopefully, none of the non-life threatening injuries were catastrophic.

If even one person received a catastrophic injury such as paralysis, if the company had bare minimum coverage that one claim could take up all the liability coverage available. For this reason, it is very important for anyone injured in such an accident to seek an attorney immediately to assert his or her claim before policy limits are potentially exhausted.

Additionally, evidence can be collected and preserved the sooner an attorney gets to work on the case. Motor carriers and their insurance companies get to work immediately to reduce their exposure. Spoliation letters to preserve evidence and the right to inspect evidence are important tools for a plaintiff's lawyer.

Punitive Damages at Issue with DUI Allegation under Georgia Law

Another part of this case is that the driver of the bus was charged with DUI. As this blog post is based on the news report linked in the first sentence of the post I must stress that the DUI charge is an allegation only and everyone charged with a crime s presumed innocent until proven guilty. However, should a personal injury lawyer have facts to prove this allegation, punitive damages will be at issue in the case. 

Under Georgia law, when a defendant was negligent while "under the influence of alcohol, drugs other than lawfully prescribed drugs administered in accordance with prescription, or any intentionally consumed glue, aerosol, or other toxic vapor to that degree that his or her judgment is substantially impaired," punitive damages with no cap or limit can be sought. See O.C.G.A. § 51-12-5.1(f). In other words, if a DUI is proven the plaintiffs are not limited to $250,000 in punitive damages as is the case with many other tort cases in Georgia. 

Let's all hope these passengers recover to good health. 

If you or a loved one have been injured in a bus wreck, DUI wreck, truck wreck, or any other type of auto accident, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Dogs Attack Three People in Gwinnett County

According to this story from Gwinnett County in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, two dogs on the loose in Lawrenceville, Georgia, yesterday attacked three different people, leaving an elderly man severely injured from head to toe. As a personal injury and wrongful death lawyer in Lawrenceville, I have seen way too many of these dog bite cases recently. According to the story the owner received six citations and the dogs were euthanized.

It is important to remember that the victims, especially the elderly man who was mauled, may have a long road to recovery with substantial medical bills and pain and suffering. According the news story, the elderly man was crossing the street when the dogs attacked. This should make liability against the owner clear.

Elements of a Georgia Dog Bite Claim

I have written before on the legal elements of a dog bite lawsuit in Georgia (click here for that blog post). Those elements, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 51-2-7 are:

  1. A person owns OR keeps,
  2. A vicious or dangerous animal,
  3. Which the person carelessly manages OR allows the animal to go at liberty,
  4. Injury is caused by the careless management or letting the animal go at liberty, and
  5. The injured person does not provoke the injury

As explained in my earlier blog post cited above, the second element involves a plaintiff showing a vicious propensity of the animal which attacks. However the plain language of O.C.G.A. § 51-2-7 contains and exception to this requirement by stating, "[in] proving vicious propensity, it shall be sufficient to show that the animal was required to be at heel or on a leash by an ordinance of a city, county, or consolidated government, and the said animal was at the time of the occurrence not at heel or on a leash."

In other words, if the dogs were running loose in violation of a local ordinance, as the AJC story seems to indicate, the vicious propensity element will be met. 

Gwinnett County's Dog Bite / Animal Running at Large Ordinance

Gwinnett county has such an ordinance. Gwinnett County code section 10-71 states:

(a) It shall be unlawful for any owner or possessor of any dog to fail to keep the dog under restraint or control as provided for in this section.

(b) A dog is considered not under restraint or control when it is running at large, whether wearing a collar and tag or not . . .

Are the Funds to Pay for a Dog Bite Victim's Recovery?

One question for the victims of yesterday's dog bite attacks will be the source of recovery. Does the dog's owner have homeowners liability insurance and/or an umbrella policy to cover the damages to these innocent victims? Dog bites are actually the number one source of homeowners insurance liability claims

Let's all hope that the victims in these Gwinnett County dog bite attacks yesterday in Lawrenceville, Georgia, are able to recover to good health. 

If you or a loved one have been the victim of a dog bite, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Georgia storefront car crash news story

This blog post by Lawrenceville, GA personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond focuses on storefront car crashes. The Armond Firm, LLC, is located in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and litigates cases throughout metropolitan Atlanta and across the State of Georgia. If you or a loved one have been injured or lost in a storefront car crash accident contact trial attorney Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation regarding a potential personal injury or wrongful death case.

Today a pickup truck reportedly crashed into a business in DeKalb County, Georgia. According to the AJC news report no injuries were reported. As you can see in the linked story there was, however, significant damage to the business and some power lines. 

Statistically storefront car crashes can be quite dangerous. According to the Storefront Safety Council operator error (30%) and pedal error (26%) are the leading causes of storefront car accidents. Their site reports this data was compiled from analysis of 11,000 accidents from 2013-2017. 

Storefront car crashes are a public safety concern. Fortunately in the local Atlanta news story nobody was injured. However, there are nearly 500 deaths in storefront car crashes nationwide each year. 

From the perspective of a personal injury and wrongful death attorney, most of the time the driver of the at-fault vehicle will be liable and the driver's liability insurance carrier and the victim's (if available) uninsured motorist insurance carrier will be sources of recovery. 

However, as the Storefront Safety Council points out, proper safety practices by a business can prevent these crashes. In parts of the country ordinances and laws are in place with safety measures designed to protect innocent victims of these car vs. pedestrian accidents. Additionally, some businesses have had a history of more than one of these types of crashes. In some instances it is feasible a business could also be subject to premises liability depending on all the facts and circumstances of a case.

If you or a loved one have been injured or lost in a car accident, pedestrian accident, storefront car crash, or any other accident in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based car and pedestrian accident lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Georgia hit and run car-pedestrian accident

Georgia personal injury case issues in a hit-and-run car and pedestrian accident

A sad story out of Cobb County, Georgia, is in the AJC regarding an incident yesterday in which an alleged hit-and-run driver struck with his car a six year-old boy who was a pedestrian. As a personal injury attorney based in Lawrenceville, Georgia, (Gwinnett County) who handles car accident and pedestrian accident cases all around metropolitan Atlanta and the State of Georgia, I will analyze this news story for potential issues in a Georgia personal injury case. Fortunately, according to the story, though a witness feared for the life of child, he suffered two broken legs but no permanent damage.

Liability in a Georgia car accident or pedestrian accident case (duty and breach of duty)

According to the AJC report linked above the hit-and-run driver is alleged by police to have "improperly passed the stopped traffic and drove on the wrong side of the roadway and struck the victim in the crosswalk." These allegations, if proved, could form the basis for a claim of negligence on the part of the driver for violating Georgia's rules of the road. That one quote alleges multiple different obvious traffic violations.

  1. O.C.G.A. § 40-6-44 provides:  "No vehicle shall be driven to the left side of the center of the roadway in overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction unless such left side is clearly visible and is free of oncoming traffic for a sufficient distance ahead to permit such overtaking and passing to be completely made without interfering with the operation of any vehicle approaching from the opposite direction or any vehicle overtaken. In every event, the overtaking vehicle shall return to an authorized lane of travel as soon as practicable and, in the event the passing movement involves the use of a lane authorized for vehicles approaching from the opposite direction, before coming within 200 feet of any approaching vehicle."
  2. O.C.G.A. § 40-6-40(a)(1) provides:  "(a) Upon all roadways of sufficient width, a vehicle shall be driven upon the right half of the roadway, except as follows: (1) When overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction under the rules governing such movement;"
  3. O.C.G.A. §§ 40-6-91(a) and (d) provide:  "(a) The driver of a vehicle shall stop and remain stopped to allow a pedestrian to cross the roadway within a crosswalk when the pedestrian is upon the half of the roadway upon which the vehicle is traveling, or when the pedestrian is approaching and is within one lane of the half of the roadway on which the vehicle is traveling or onto which it is turning. For the purposes of this subsection, "half of the roadway" means all traffic lanes carrying traffic in one direction of travel. . .(d) Whenever any vehicle is stopped at a marked crosswalk or at any unmarked crosswalk at an intersection to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle."

Additionally, the allegations against the driver, if provable in court, will likely result in additional criminal charges for Reckless Driving in violation of O.C.G.A. § 40-6-390 (driving in reckless disregard for the safety of persons or property), felony Hit and Run in violation of O.C.G.A. § 40-6-270 (a hit and run in which the accident is the proximate cause of serious injury or death), and felony Serious Injury by Vehicle in violation of O.C.G.A. § 40-6-394 (accident that temporarily rendered useless the legs of the child, which is one of three qualifying injuries to prove a violation of this code section--case law makes it very clear uselessness only has to be temporary).

These violations, if proven, would show that the driver had a duty under the law and that he breached that duty.

Causation

Causation should be very clear in a case like the one outlined in the AJC. The driver striking a child in a crosswalk with his car caused the two broken legs.

Damages

The six year-old child suffered significant injury. Two broken legs, weeks to months in casts, physical therapy, lost time playing with friends and doing the things a six-year old boy likes to do, the significant pain he suffered, the medical and rehabilitation bills--all of that adds up to damages in a case such as this. Fortunately, the child apparently did not suffer life-altering injuries as this Georgia traffic accident between a car and pedestrian could have been much worse. 

Sources of Recovery

The first source of recovery will be the insurance company who insured the alleged hit-and-run driver. Hopefully he had insurance on the vehicle. A major issue with the driver's insurance coverage will be how much his policy is worth. Did he have bare minimum coverage under Georgia law which would involve only $25,000 in liability insurance? A case such as this will likely involve damages well above the minimum.

A second potential source will be whether any person in the child's household has an automobile insurance policy with uninsured motorist coverage. If so, any such policies are a potential source of coverage in the event the driver (1) did not have insurance, or (2) damages exceed the policy limit on the driver's policy. Even if the driver had insurance, uninsured motorist coverage typically covers damages exceeding the policy limits of the other driver's policy in a case such as this. One note of caution:  uninsured motorist policies typically have strict time limitations and notice requirements which must be complied with to avoid a coverage denial. This is why in cases such as this it is smart to get a Georgia personal injury lawyer involved immediately.

Again, fortunately the child was not injured worse. Let's all hope and pray for a speedy recovery for him. 

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car or pedestrian accident in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based car and pedestrian accident lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

 

Georgia Legal Issues: Fatal Car Accident in Gwinnett County

Fatal Car Accident in Gwinnett County

This past Monday a construction worker was fatally injured when he was struck by a car in a tragic accident near Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road, according to a report from the AJC. This post will outline someone of the issues a Georgia personal injury and wrongful death attorney practicing in Gwinnett County or metro Atlanta would look at if a loved were to do a free consultation for a case such as this. Trial lawyer Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, offers free consultations on Georgia personal injury and wrongful death cases.

The essential facts of the AJC report are that a construction worker who was wearing a reflective jacket and helmet was struck by a car in the area of Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road (Ga. 317) and I-85 near I-985 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. The construction worker died later at the hospital. According to the Gwinnett County Police Department charges are forthcoming on the driver. 

"Modified comparative negligence" law in Georgia

One of the first things a Georgia injury attorney in a wrongful death case would look at in a case like the fatal car accident in Gwinnett County outlined in the AJC story is liability. In a consultation setting, this may not always be clear. Georgia law is a "modified comparative negligence" state, as per O.C.G.A. § 51-12-33. A plaintiff can recover if he, or in the case of wrongful death those who can recover on his behalf, is less than 50% at fault. If the deceased was negligent in some way (example: was he in the roadway where he should not have been or was he follow proper safety protocols), but 49.9% responsible or less, there can be an award. If a jury ultimately finds the plaintiff 50% or more at fault, there is no recovery. Also, the plaintiff's recovery is reduced by the percentage he is at fault. An attorney would not necessarily know enough details at a consultation to know who all the parties in a lawsuit would be, but the driver of the vehicle, the worker's employer, other construction companies working at the site, conditions of the site, etc., are all things an attorney will analyze.

A Georgia personal injury and wrongful death attorney in a fatality car accident case such as this one will try to determine:

1.  Was the driver of the vehicle at fault? The police seem to indicate charges are forthcoming. I stress that at this time full details are unknown as to whether the driver violated any laws or was negligent in his or her operation of the vehicle. However, if there is evidence of negligence and/or a violation of the rules of the road the driver and his insurance company will be a potential source of recovery. Later, we would be able to determine how much insurance coverage was in place.

2. Was the construction worker an employee at the time (and not an independent contractor)? Georgia law has some limited allowance for recovery for a death during the course of employment at O.C.G.A. § 34-9-265 (workers compensation). A Georgia personal injury and wrongful death attorney will certainly look to see if the workers compensation laws are applicable to any wrongful death in the course of employment.

3. Was the victim responsible in any way? Again, not knowing all the details of the investigation, this will be difficult to ascertain at a consultation, but it is something to analyze when investigating the case. 

4. Are there any other parties who were negligent or contributed to this death? You always have too look at all aspects of the case. Were other companies working on the road and may they be responsible?

5. Did the victim have uninsured motorist coverage on any auto insurance policy in his household? If so, the insurance company must be notified promptly as any such policy may likely cover him for this wreck, but there are typically strict time limitations in those insurance contracts which require notification in writing to the insurance company promptly. 

Who is the proper person to bring a wrongful death lawsuit on behalf of the deceased?

A Georgia personal injury and wrongful death attorney will need to determine who can bring a claim and lawsuit in a case such as this. I have posted before (click here) on who the proper party is in a lawsuit. The correct person must bring the action. Additionally, if workers compensation is applicable, Title 34, Chapter 9 will control who, if anyone, has a claim as a dependent of the deceased.

The initial AJC report seems to indicate this tragic car accident may have wrongfully took the life of a person. Our thoughts and prayers are with those he left behind. Georgia fatality traffic accidents occur too frequently and leave families without a loved one and often in financial distress.

If a loved one of yours has been lost in a car accident or any other wrongful death at the hands of another in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Dog bites are the number one source of homeowners liability claims.

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, is licensed to practice law in the State of Georgia. Based in Gwinnett County, he handles serious injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. Call him for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585.

Dog bites are the number one source of homeowners insurance liability claims, and, according to the Insurance Information Institute, they account for more than one-third of all homeowners liability payouts. In Georgia, under O.C.G.A. § 51-2-7, a dog owner can be liable for a bite when he either (1) knew of the vicious or dangerous nature of his dog and was careless in managing the dog or let it go at liberty, or, (2) lets the dog go at liberty when he is required to keep it “at heel” or on a leash by any city or county ordinance (this second method proves a vicious propensity in the dog without requiring any history of prior viciousness). In all cases the dog attack victim must not provoke the attack. The statute applies to all animals, with the exception of domesticated fowls, and not just dogs. If an animal attacks, the owner can be held liable under Georgia law.

Dog owners, regardless of the dog’s breed, can be held liable. This is true whether it is a large pit bull, chow, or doberman, or whether the dog is a toy Maltese. Obviously in many cases, the larger and stronger the dog, the worse the injuries will be. Dog owners can be held liable for bites that may require a few stitches as wells as the horrific dog attacks we sometimes hear of on the evening news. It is important to get an attorney working on a case right away. Key witnesses such as neighbors move away over time. When a vicious propensity of a dog is a key element to prove in these cases you want an attorney getting to work right away.

The full text of O.C.G.A. § 51-2-7 reads:

“A person who owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and who, by careless management or by allowing the animal to go at liberty, causes injury to another person who does not provoke the injury by his own act may be liable in damages to the person so injured. In proving vicious propensity, it shall be sufficient to show that the animal was required to be at heel or on a leash by an ordinance of a city, county, or consolidated government, and the said animal was at the time of the occurrence not at heel or on a leash. The foregoing sentence shall not apply to domesticated fowl including roosters with spurs. The foregoing sentence shall not apply to domesticated livestock.”

If you or a loved one have suffered an injury because of a dog bite please contact attorney Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation today.

For a link to the Insurance Information Institute statistics, click here.

The information above is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.