Utah change in legal BAC limit to 0.05 may save lives

This blog post addresses a change in DUI law designed to prevent wrongful deaths and serious injuries in automobile accidents involving alcohol impaired drivers. Earlier this week a new law went into effect in Utah lowering the legal BAC to 0.05. Other states will surely be watching to see what effect this change has in saving lives in DUI related traffic accidents.

The USA Today (link to story here) published an interesting piece regarding some of the statistics regarding DUI accidents and fatalities pertaining to the lower 0.05 BAC limit. The story cites and links to a study (link to study on National Institutes of Health website here) by James Fell and Robert Voas which “concluded that a .05 BAC limit would prevent 11 percent of fatal crashes involving alcohol and save nearly 1,800 lives each year.”

The USA Today story further cites NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) statistics which show that when a person has a BAC between 0.05 and 0.079 that person is seven times more likely to be in a fatal accident than a person with no alcohol in his blood.

They also cite statistics from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) which show a person can start exhibiting impairment from alcohol with a BAC as low as 0.02 and that driving skills worsen considerably when a person’s BAC reaches 0.05.

Of particular note in the story, though 67% of fatality DUI accidents involve drivers with BACs of 0.15 and above, in 2016 there were 2,017 alcohol related fatalities nationwide involving drivers with BACs of under 0.08 (the legal limit currently in Georgia).

It will be interesting to see what effect this change has on traffic fatalities in Utah in 2019. If it has any significant impact on saving lives I would predict other states will soon follow by changing their laws. The USA Today story notes that most developed countries already have stricter DUI limits such as Utah’s new 0.05 legal limit.

If you or a loved one have been injured or killed in a Georgia traffic accident with a DUI driver, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Safety Tips for One of the Most Dangerous Nights: Halloween

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585.

Halloween is next Tuesday. Let's take a minute to review some basic safety tips to keep your children safe. According to CDC statistics kept between 1975 and 1996, child pedestrian fatalities are four times higher on Halloween evening when compared to all other evenings during the course of the year. Halloween has become in recent years as much of an adult holiday as a child holiday. NHTSA reports that on Halloween in 2012 48% of crash fatalities involved drunk drivers compared to 31% on an average day that year and that 28% of those crashes involved pedestrians compared to 14% on an average day. When trick-or-treating please remember:

  • Children should be accompanied by an adult
  • Older children should travel in groups   
  • Trick-or-treaters should have flashlights, glow sticks, and reflective articles of clothing
  • Don't wear disguises that obstruct vision
  • Stay on sidewalks or off the roadways
  • Walk facing traffic
  • Look both ways before crossing and use crosswalks and intersections to make crossings
  • In addition to looking, listen for traffic
  • Never come out into the street from between parked cars or run into the street
  • Parents should establish a time for their older children to return home and should have set check-in times by mobile phone

Halloween should be a fun night for children. The tips above are by no means all-inclusive. Please remember to use common sense to keep your children safe on Halloween. If you or a loved one have been injured in a Halloween accident contact attorney Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation today.

The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.

Georgia's Opioid Epidemic and CDC Statistics

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, is licensed to practice law in the State of Georgia. Based in Gwinnett County, he handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. Call him for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585.

The CDC reports that in 2014 accidents, or unintentional injuries, were the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. And in those statistics we can see a developing trend in accidental deaths:  unintentional poisoning is the leading cause of accidental death, with motor vehicle accidents being the second leading cause. From 2002 to 2010, the statistics show that unintentional motor vehicle accidents were the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. However, in 2011, poisoning took the top spot and has since remained the leading cause of accidental death. As the CDC further explains, many of the poisoning deaths in the United States appear to be drug-related, both from illicit drug use and from prescription drug use. 

As someone who spent the first nine and a half years of my legal career as a prosecutor in Gwinnett County, Georgia, I have seen first-hand the experiences of people dealing with the opioid epidemic in this country. Drug treatment courts are a start to addressing the problem in the court system. It is not uncommon to see heroin addicts who got their start with a lawful prescription for opioid painkillers. Some drug companies, physicians, pharmacists, and others in the medical industry are to blame for the over-prescription of these drugs and the misuse of these drugs and may be able to be held civilly liable. If you or a loved one have been harmed or killed by potential negligence in the prescription of drugs in Georgia, contact attorney Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation today.

The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.