Georgia senator aims to reduce trucking accidents and fatalities

This blog post by metro Atlanta personal injury and wrongful death attorney Richard Armond deals with legislation introduced by U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson of Georgia which is aimed at making us safer from trucking accidents.

According to a story in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, United States Senator Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) introduced bipartisan legislation last week with senator Chris Coons (D-De.) aimed at requiring speed-limiting software in trucks which would limit them to 65 miles per hour. The story indicates Isakson's interest in this legislation dates back to a 2015 tractor-trailer wreck that killed five Georgia Southern University nursing students.

Evidently, this "speed limiter rule" was proposed as Department of Transportation regulation about a decade ago, but has been stalled through delay after delay. The current administration has delayed action on the rule indefinitely. The newly proposed legislation would bypass the administrative regulation process by making it law. Georgia senator Isakson is quoted as saying most other countries already use this software to cap truck speed limits and the article further mentions that most truck in the United States already have this software.

 
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If your or a loved one have been injured or lost in a trucking accident case in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based personal injury and wrongful death lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.