Georgia City Passes Ordinance to Combat Distracted Driving

On January 2, 2018, the City of Smyrna became the first city in Georgia to pass a full ban on the use of cellphones while driving. According to WSB, the ordinance will go into effect on April 2, 2018, and carries a maximum fine of $150. WSB reports that Smyrna plans to collect data for two years to see if the ordinance reduces distracted driving crashes.

I have written before (click here) about the dangers of distracted driving and the current statutes in effect to combat this problem on Georgia roads. The ordinance by Smyrna, which apparently bans even holding a cellphone while driving, is an interesting step to try making their roads safer. The current statewide Georgia laws against texting while driving are difficult to enforce and even specifically allow normal phone use such as dialing a number while driving (See O.C.G.A. § 40-6-241: "the proper use of a . . . mobile telephone . . . shall not be a violation of this Code section"). 

Serious injuries and wrongful deaths due to cell phone use are reaching epidemic proportions on Georgia's roads. Hopefully, the Smyrna ordinance will make their roads safer and will be an example for the Georgia General Assembly to take action with a cell phone law that better protects Georgia citizens.

If you or a loved one have suffered an injury or loss in a traffic accident or pedestrian accident in metro Atlanta or anywhere in Georgia, please contact Gwinnett County based injury lawyer Richard Armond at (678) 661-9585 for a free consultation. 

Attorney Richard Armond of The Armond Firm, LLC, handles serious personal injury and wrongful death cases throughout metro Atlanta and the State of Georgia. He is licensed to practice law by the State Bar of Georgia and is based in Lawrenceville, one mile down the road from the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center. Call him today for a free consultation at (678) 661-9585. The information above is for informational purposes only as of the date of publication and should not be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the reading of it form an attorney-client relationship. Always consult directly with an attorney for legal advice.